United Nations

DESA Population Division About Us Publications Meetings Contact

Home

Press Release

Frequently Asked Questions

Data in EXCEL format

Urban and Rural Populations

Urban Agglomerations

Data (on-line database)

Urban and Rural Populations

Urban Agglomerations

Country Profiles: Data

Data Visualization

Analytical Figures

Country Profiles: Figures

Maps

Maps (GIS-format)

Reports / Other Documents

Highlights: Key Findings

Wall Charts

Methodology

Data Sources

Definition of Regions

Glossary of Demographic Terms

Definition problems

Final Report

Archive

Other Information

Order Form: CD-ROMs

Licence Agreement

World Population Prospects

 

 

Notes
(1) Proportions of urban and rural population in the current country or area in per cent of the total population, 1950 to 2050.
(2) Proportions of urban population in the current country as compared to the major area and region in which this country is located. The proportion is expressed in per cent of the population between 1950 and 2050.
(3) Proportion of urban population in the current country (blue line), major area (red line) and region (green line) as compared to the ranked urban proportions of all countries of the world (gray area). The figure illustrates, what level of urbanization a country has compared to its major area and region, as well as compared to all other countries of the world.
(4) Urban and rural population in the current country.
(5) Urban population of the current country by size class of its urban agglomerations in 2011. The light blue area is a residual category, which includes all cities and urban agglomerations with a population of less than 750,000 inhabitants. The size classes correspond to the legend below:


(6) Average annual growth rate of the urban population of the current country between 1950 and 2011 (blue line), as compared with the average annual growth rates of the urban population of all countries of the world (gray area). The figure illustrates that urban growth rates between 1950 and 2011 were positive in the great majority of the countries of the world. Only a few countries had negative urban growth rates - indicating that their urban proportion was declining between 1950 and 2011.
Due to limitations of space official country names had to be abbreviated in the figure legends.

Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2012): World Urbanization Prospects: The 2011 Revision. New York

Updated: 25 April 2012

 
This web site is best viewed at a screen resolution of at least 1280 x 1024 with a maximized window.

Copyright | Terms of Use | Privacy Notice | Contact | Fraud Alert | Help